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Summary

This tutorial covered everything it takes to get a complete, navigable, illustrated document onto the wireless web via WML or XHTML Mobile. You started out by learning some general information about the wireless web and the evolution of markup languages for creating wireless web pages. You then delved into the mechanics of creating a WML document, starting with the basics of working with a microbrowser simulator on your PC. You found out how to set up the deck and its component cards, design navigation routes, map tasks to the microbrowser's softkeys, and insert an image into a document. Moving up a little on the ladder, you then explored setting up the document for user inputuseful for simple name or password entries. And finally, the lesson concluded by taking what you learned about WML and scaling it over to XHTML Mobile.

Q&A

Q.

Why bother with WML if XHTML Mobile is the wave of the future?

A.

There is certainly an argument that you shouldn't bother with WML given that XHTML Mobile is likely the future of the wireless web. However, given that so many devices support WML, it's hard to move beyond it just yet. Besides, the deck of cards metaphor can be handy in that it allows you to create the effect of multiple "pages" within a single WML document. If carefully controlling the formatting of mobile pages is important to you, by all means go with XHTML Mobile. Otherwise, WML isn't a bad option due to its widespread support.

Q.

How do I convert a normal XHTML document to XHTML Mobile?

A.

Because the syntax is identical between the two languages, the main trick is to eliminate features that aren't supported in XHTML Mobile, such as frames. Beyond that, your main challenge is in scaling down any images and simplifying styles so that pages look good on a small display that has potentially fewer colors to work with.

Workshop

The Workshop is designed to help you anticipate possible questions, review what you've learned, and begin learning how to put your knowledge into practice.

Quiz

1.

WML is a component of what transmission protocoland what does the acronym stand for?

2.

What navigation techniquethat is, which element and attributeshould you use if you want to present the user with a numbered list from which she can jump to other cards or documents?

3.

How many bits are in a WBMP image?

4.

The select element is a child of what WML parent element?

Quiz Answers

1.

Wireless Markup Language is a component of WAP, or Wireless Access Protocol.

2.

Use the select element with the option attribute.

3.

Only one! That means you get a straight black-and-white image, with no shades of gray.

4.

The p (paragraph) element.

Exercises

1.

Using do>type, set up a Help card for the FilmTime site.

2.

Design a short and simple animation sequence (suggested length 510 frames) played by using the ontimer event.

by BrainBellupdated
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