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Repeat a Header Row

The Problem:

Today's report has an ugly six-page table in it. I'm cleaning it up, and every time I make an editeven applying or removing formattingthe rows bounce from one page to the next. That means the heading rows on the second and subsequent pages are now in the wrong place. I moved them back the first time I noticed it, but they keep jumping around. I guess I'd better leave 'em until I finish editing.

The Solution:

If they're moving around, they're not real heading rows: they're just normal rows formatted to look like heading rows. Word can automatically repeat one or more heading rows for you when the table goes to a second or subsequent page. Set up the row (or rows) on the first page, select it (or them), and choose Table » Heading Rows Repeat. When rows walk from one page to another, Word keeps the header row or rows in the right place.

Delete a Table, Not Just Its Contents

The Problem:

Call me anal, but I hate inconsistency in the Windows interface. Over the last couple of months, I've grown used to selecting what I want to delete and then pressing the Delete key to off it. (Yes, I've offed the Recycle Bin already.) It works in Explorer, works in Excel, and works in Word...but not for tables. When I try to delete the selected part of a table, all Word does is delete the contents of the cells. Pavlov would be rolling in his kennel.

The Solution:

There's no real fix, but understanding the rationale for Word's behavior might help you feel better. Word's designers decided to draw a distinction between deleting all or part of a table's contents and all or part of its structure. So a standard Delete command deletes contents, while the easiest way to delete the table's structure (with any contents that remain) is to select the appropriate part of the table and then press Backspace. You can also choose Table » Delete and choose Table, Columns, Rows, or Cells (as appropriate) from the submenu.

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